Jessica Suhrheinrich, Ph.D. 

Assistant Adjunct Professor

 

Contact Information

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center
3020 Children’s Way, MC 5033
San Diego, CA 92123
T: (858) 966-7703 x3809
F: (858) 966-7704
jsuhrheinrich@ucsd.edu

Biography

Dr. Suhrheinrich received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego and completed post-doctoral training in autism services at the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center at Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego. Dr. Suhrheinrich’s current research involves working within existing community service systems to improve access to evidence-based practices for autism treatment. This includes the development of and effectiveness testing for specific methods of educating providers of children with autism, adapting evidence-based practices for use in school settings, and enhancing fidelity of implementation evaluation procedures to fit within community service supervision systems. More specifically, one project evaluates the efficacy of and evidence-based intervention that has been adapted in partnership with community special education teachers. The cluster randomized waitlist-control trail involves on-going collaboration with 17 school districts in San Diego county and extensive training, coaching and fidelity monitoring over 3 years. A second project aims to identify key ingredients of one evidence-based practice for autism and adapt current fidelity measures to improve efficiency and effectiveness within community service systems for children with autism.

Research Interests

Research Focus

The broad aim of her research is to inform strategies for enhancing the effectiveness of interventions for autism in community service settings. Dr. Suhrheinrich’s professional interests and experience have focused on a variety of issues related to autism intervention in both clinical and research settings. 

Dr. Suhrheinrich’s current research involves working within existing community service systems to improve access to evidence-based practices for autism treatment.  This includes the development of and effectiveness testing for specific methods of educating providers of children with autism, adapting evidence-based practices for use in school settings, and enhancing fidelity of implementation evaluation procedures to fit within community service supervision systems.  More specifically, one project evaluates the efficacy of and evidence-based intervention that has been adapted in partnership with community special education teachers.  The cluster randomized waitlist-control trail involves on-going collaboration with 17 school districts in San Diego county and extensive training, coaching and fidelity monitoring over 3 years. A second project aims to identify key ingredients of one evidence-based practice for autism, PRT, and adapt current fidelity measures to improve efficiency and effectiveness within community service systems for children with autism.

Publications

  • Rieth, S., Stahmer, A.C., Suhrheinrich, J., & Schreibman, L., Kennedy, J., & Ross, B. (2013). Identifying Critical Elements of Treatment: Examining the Use of Turn Taking in Autism Intervention. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities. doi: 10.1177/1088357613513792
  • Suhrheinrich, J., Stahmer, A. C., Reed, S., Schreibman, L., Reisinger, E. & Mandell, D. (2013). Implementation challenges in translating pivotal response training into community settings. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,43, 2970-2976. doi: 10.1007/s10803-013-1826-7
  • Reed, S., Stahmer, A.C., Suhrheinrich, J., & Schreibman, L. (2013). Stimulus overselectivity in typical Development: Implications for teaching children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(6).
  • Stahmer, A. C., Suhrheinrich, J., Reed, S., & Schreibman, L. (2012). What works for you? Using teacher feedback to inform adaptations of an evidence-based practice for classroom use. Autism Research and Treatment. Article ID 709861
  • Suhrheinrich, J. (2011).  Training teachers to use pivotal response training with children with autism: Coaching as a critical component.  Teacher Education and Special Education, 34 (4), 339-349.